Use of wastewater bio-solids (also known as sewage sludge)

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Bio-solid management and recycling: responsible treatment and disposal of wastewater sewage sludge.

Biosolids are the solids separated from wastewater and created during its treatment, their use in agriculture is regulated and sludge disposal strictly controlled. Treated sewage sludge (often called biosolids) contains fertiliser nutrients and can improve soil structure when applied correctly to the land. However, it may contain heavy metals and can be harmful to humans and animals if incorrectly applied.

Below are links to statements and reports by a range of scientific bodies of national or international standing. Links to further reading can be found on the right hand side of this page.

UK Learned Societies

The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) is the leading professional and examining body for scientists, engineers, environmental professionals, students, and those committed to sustainable management and development of water and the environment.

The Institute of Water is the UK professional body concerned with the UK water industry. 

UK Government and regulators

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) supports and develops UK farming, biodiversity & sustainability, and environmental policy.

The House of Commons Environmental, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee conducts enquiries and provides reports on a range of matters concerning expenditure, administration and policies of Defra.

The Environment Agency is a Non-Departmental Public Body responsible for the protection and imporvement of the environment, and to promote sustainable development. 

The Forestry Commission is a Non-Departmental Public Body responsible for the protection of Britain's forests and woodlands.

International policy and regulations

Science for Environment Policy (EU) - News updates for the EU Directorate General responsible for the Environment.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is an international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science.